SMITHSONIAN ARCHIVES OF AMERICAN ART

Aug 18

Feeling very primary today.  Sometimes basic colors are the most striking.
Ramón Carulla sketchbook, 1987-1988. Ramón Carulla papers, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.

Feeling very primary today.  Sometimes basic colors are the most striking.

Ramón Carulla sketchbook, 1987-1988. Ramón Carulla papers, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.

Aug 15

Today marks the 45th anniversary of Woodstock, but it wasn’t the only music being made in that little New York hamlet. This photo of Artist Konrad Cramer and friends was taken 20 years before the famous festival ever arrived.
Konrad Cramer playing the guitar, ca. 1949 / unidentified photographer. [Rosalie Berkowitz collection of photographs], Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.

Today marks the 45th anniversary of Woodstock, but it wasn’t the only music being made in that little New York hamlet. This photo of Artist Konrad Cramer and friends was taken 20 years before the famous festival ever arrived.

Konrad Cramer playing the guitar, ca. 1949 / unidentified photographer. [Rosalie Berkowitz collection of photographs], Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.

Aug 14

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Aug 13

What do cybernetics, media, and ecology have in common? They all inspired the innovative work of Paul Ryan. 
Ryan was a pioneer in video art and environmental activism. The finding aid to his papers is now on our website. His archive is a treasure trove of correspondence, writings, and video recordings of his projects. 
Artist book based on the Triadic Tapes, 1976. Paul Ryan papers, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.

What do cybernetics, media, and ecology have in common? They all inspired the innovative work of Paul Ryan. 

Ryan was a pioneer in video art and environmental activism. The finding aid to his papers is now on our website. His archive is a treasure trove of correspondence, writings, and video recordings of his projects. 

Artist book based on the Triadic Tapes, 1976. Paul Ryan papers, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.

Aug 12

Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney is one of our main muses around here. 100 years later and she’s still giving fresh fashion #inspo. Solid #ootd work, Gertrude. 
Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney, ca. 1913/ Adolf De Meyer, photographer. Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney papers, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.

Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney is one of our main muses around here. 100 years later and she’s still giving fresh fashion #inspo. Solid #ootd work, Gertrude. 

Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney, ca. 1913/ Adolf De Meyer, photographer. Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney papers, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.

Aug 11

Duck or funnel?  Artist John Frederick Peto, known for his trompe l’oeil, aka “fool the eye” paintings, used everyday objects, such as funnels, to deceive our sense of perception. 
Funnel prop used by John Frederick Peto, between 1890 and 1910 / unidentified photographer. John Frederick Peto and Peto family papers, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.

Duck or funnel?  Artist John Frederick Peto, known for his trompe l’oeil, aka “fool the eye” paintings, used everyday objects, such as funnels, to deceive our sense of perception. 

Funnel prop used by John Frederick Peto, between 1890 and 1910 / unidentified photographer. John Frederick Peto and Peto family papers, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.

Aug 08

19th-century Luminary Beard-off: William Cullen Bryant (left) vs. Hiram Powers. Go!
Hiram Powers and William Cullen Bryant, ca. 1865 / unidentified photographer. Hiram Powers papers, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.

19th-century Luminary Beard-off: William Cullen Bryant (left) vs. Hiram Powers. Go!

Hiram Powers and William Cullen Bryant, ca. 1865 / unidentified photographer. Hiram Powers papers, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.

Aug 07

Painter Honoré Sharrer clearly had a thing for shifty-eyed dogs…remember this suspicious character?
Detail from Honoré Sharrer study for the painting Two dogs in a still life, not after 1997. Honoré Sharrer papers, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.

Painter Honoré Sharrer clearly had a thing for shifty-eyed dogs…remember this suspicious character?

Detail from Honoré Sharrer study for the painting Two dogs in a still life, not after 1997. Honoré Sharrer papers, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.

Aug 06

smithsonian:

This day in history, pop artist Andy Warhol was born in Pittsburgh, PA. Many of Warhol’s works of art focused upon celebrity culture, as well as branding & advertising; some of his most famous imagery displayed Marilyn Monroe and Campbell’s Tomato Soup cans. The artist attracted hoards of fans, including musicians and activists like John Lennon and Yoko Ono. Photo courtesy of archivesofamericanart

 Yoko Ono, John Lennon and Andy Warhol, 1971 June 5 / David Bourdon, photographer. David Bourdon papers, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.

smithsonian:

This day in history, pop artist Andy Warhol was born in Pittsburgh, PA. Many of Warhol’s works of art focused upon celebrity culture, as well as branding & advertising; some of his most famous imagery displayed Marilyn Monroe and Campbell’s Tomato Soup cans. The artist attracted hoards of fans, including musicians and activists like John Lennon and Yoko Ono. Photo courtesy of archivesofamericanart

Yoko Ono, John Lennon and Andy Warhol, 1971 June 5 / David Bourdon, photographer. David Bourdon papers, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.

In 1949, Andy Warhol was a young artist grateful to have his work accepted by Harper’s Magazine. He wrote to editor Russell Lynes noting that his “life couldn’t fill a penny postcard” and that he was “moving from one roach infested apartment to another.” You’ve come a long way, Andy baby! Happy birthday.
Andy Warhol letter to Russell Lynes, 1949. Harper’s Magazine records kept by managing editor Russell Lynes, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.

In 1949, Andy Warhol was a young artist grateful to have his work accepted by Harper’s Magazine. He wrote to editor Russell Lynes noting that his “life couldn’t fill a penny postcard” and that he was “moving from one roach infested apartment to another.” You’ve come a long way, Andy baby! Happy birthday.

Andy Warhol letter to Russell Lynes, 1949. Harper’s Magazine records kept by managing editor Russell Lynes, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.