SMITHSONIAN ARCHIVES OF AMERICAN ART

Sep 29


On This Day in 1936, Arthur Dove noted details about the weather in his diary. Diaries may provide a valuable record of working methods, or in some cases, the conceptual development of a particular work of art. Many of Dove’s paintings illustrate his interest in natural phenomena. 
This diary is currently on view in our exhibition "A Day in the Life: Artists’ Diaries from the Archives of American Art."
For more on Dove’s diaries and his paintings, read Jennifer Stettler Parson’s essay, "Absence and Presence: Arthur Dove’s Paintings ‘From the Radio’" on our website. 
Helen Torr Dove and Arthur Dove diary, 1936. Arthur and Helen Torr Dove papers, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.

On This Day in 1936, Arthur Dove noted details about the weather in his diary. Diaries may provide a valuable record of working methods, or in some cases, the conceptual development of a particular work of art. Many of Dove’s paintings illustrate his interest in natural phenomena. 

This diary is currently on view in our exhibition "A Day in the Life: Artists’ Diaries from the Archives of American Art."

For more on Dove’s diaries and his paintings, read Jennifer Stettler Parson’s essay, "Absence and Presence: Arthur Dove’s Paintings ‘From the Radio’" on our website.

Helen Torr Dove and Arthur Dove diary, 1936. Arthur and Helen Torr Dove papers, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.

Sep 26

[video]

Sep 25

Why do you keep a diary?



Our exhibition “A Day in the Life: Artists’ Diaries from the Archives of American Art” opens tomorrow in Washington, D.C. 
Jack Tworkov diary, 1953 August 13-1962 April 30. Jack Tworkov papers, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.

Why do you keep a diary?

Our exhibition “A Day in the Life: Artists’ Diaries from the Archives of American Art” opens tomorrow in Washington, D.C

Jack Tworkov diary, 1953 August 13-1962 April 30. Jack Tworkov papers, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.

Sep 24

A lifetime captured in a GIF. Sculptor Katharine Lane Weems wrote in her diaries for 60 years, from when she a young girl with a passion for art and dogs into a mature woman and accomplished wildlife sculptor.
Her diaries will be on exhibit in “A Day in the Life: Artists’ Diaries from the Archives of American Art." The exhibit opens Friday, September 26 in our Lawrence A. Fleischman Gallery.

A lifetime captured in a GIF. Sculptor Katharine Lane Weems wrote in her diaries for 60 years, from when she a young girl with a passion for art and dogs into a mature woman and accomplished wildlife sculptor.

Her diaries will be on exhibit in “A Day in the Life: Artists’ Diaries from the Archives of American Art." The exhibit opens Friday, September 26 in our Lawrence A. Fleischman Gallery.

Sep 23

For many artists, writing in their diary was as habitual as making their morning coffee or brushing their teeth before bed. Frederick Hammersley wrote in this diary for 3 years. In his small, angular handwriting, he summarized the events of each day, focusing on school and studio work. Each entry is carefully colorblocked and as a result, the diary mimics the aesthetic of his paintings.
This diary will be on view in our next exhibition, “A Day in the Life: Artists’ Diaries from the Archives of American Art” in the Lawrence A. Fleischman Gallery. 
Frederick Hammersley diary, 1952-1956, bulk 1952-1954. Frederick Hammersley papers, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.

For many artists, writing in their diary was as habitual as making their morning coffee or brushing their teeth before bed. Frederick Hammersley wrote in this diary for 3 years. In his small, angular handwriting, he summarized the events of each day, focusing on school and studio work. Each entry is carefully colorblocked and as a result, the diary mimics the aesthetic of his paintings.

This diary will be on view in our next exhibition, “A Day in the Life: Artists’ Diaries from the Archives of American Art” in the Lawrence A. Fleischman Gallery.

Frederick Hammersley diary, 1952-1956, bulk 1952-1954. Frederick Hammersley papers, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.

Sep 22

[video]

Sep 19

If you could read an artist’s diary, whose would you choose?
Our next exhibition, “A Day in the Life: Artists’ Diaries from the Archives of American Art” opens NEXT FRIDAY at the Lawrence A. Fleischman Gallery in Washington, D.C. Come get lost in the pages of diaries by artists including Joseph Cornell, Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney, and Reuben Tam.
image credit: Pocket diaries by F. Luis Mora. F. Luis Mora papers, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.

If you could read an artist’s diary, whose would you choose?

Our next exhibition, “A Day in the Life: Artists’ Diaries from the Archives of American Art” opens NEXT FRIDAY at the Lawrence A. Fleischman Gallery in Washington, D.C. Come get lost in the pages of diaries by artists including Joseph Cornell, Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney, and Reuben Tam.

image credit: Pocket diaries by F. Luis Mora. F. Luis Mora papers, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.

Sep 18

If you have been keeping up with Ken Burns’s film The Roosevelts on PBS this week, you know the origin of Theodore Roosevelt’s “big stick” diplomacy. Here is T.R., speaking softly and carrying a big stick, drawn by editorial cartoonist C.R. (Charles Raymond) Macauley.
It comes from an autograph book belonging to James D. Preston, who was the Superintendent of the United States Senate Press Gallery for 35 years. Notable cartoonists such as Rube Goldberg, Clifford K. Berryman, Harry Furniss, and Art Young left their autographs and drawings in this book between 1904 and 1924. 
James D. Preston autograph book, 1904-1924. James David Preston illustrated autograph book, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.

If you have been keeping up with Ken Burns’s film The Roosevelts on PBS this week, you know the origin of Theodore Roosevelt’s “big stick” diplomacy. Here is T.R., speaking softly and carrying a big stick, drawn by editorial cartoonist C.R. (Charles Raymond) Macauley.

It comes from an autograph book belonging to James D. Preston, who was the Superintendent of the United States Senate Press Gallery for 35 years. Notable cartoonists such as Rube Goldberg, Clifford K. Berryman, Harry Furniss, and Art Young left their autographs and drawings in this book between 1904 and 1924.

James D. Preston autograph book, 1904-1924. James David Preston illustrated autograph book, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.

Sep 16

Football season is upon us and this is about as close as some of us will get to  watching a game this year. Known for his insanely realistic lifecast sculptures, Duane Hanson poses with his Football Player sculpture.  
Duane Hanson with his sculpture Football Player, 1984 / unidentified photographer. Duane Hanson papers, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.

Football season is upon us and this is about as close as some of us will get to  watching a game this year. Known for his insanely realistic lifecast sculptures, Duane Hanson poses with his Football Player sculpture.  

Duane Hanson with his sculpture Football Player, 1984 / unidentified photographer. Duane Hanson papers, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.

Sep 12

Are you really creative and a little bit of a geek?

Well, we are still accepting applications for our User Experience Internship. If you’re crazy about design and excited about the interwebs, check it out!